Category Archives: Country cooking recipes

Roast Pumpkin Soup

Roast Pumpkin Soup

When we are at the fruit shop the other day they had a large bin of Butternuts for $1 each, so I grabbed one though in retrospect I should have grabbed a couple more.
I had planned to use the Pumpkin Soup recipe I have used before but to play with it a bit more. However, then I got thinking about the fantastic Roasted(?) Pumpkin Soup that Mary had had when we went to the Chocolate Buffet so I googled Roast Pumpkin Soup and lo and behold the first result up is from the ABC 🙂 The various ABC radio stations all feature various recipes and then the recipes from all across the country are placed in the one index – Backyard Recipe Index.
So seeing that the first result up was an ABC recipe I thought why the hell not, I’ll use this one, sure I made a few changes but it was so good, even Mum was chowing into it!

Roast Pumpkin Soup
adapted from a recipe by Elaine Wilson

Ingredients
1 butternut pumpkin, peeled and diced into medium sized cubes (3.5cmish)
4, 5, 6 cloves garlic, unpeeled (I would say use a clove per serving, it just enhances the flavour a bit)
a couple of tablespoons of soft brown sugar
1 large onion chopped
2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 carrot chopped
1 stick of celery chopped
4 cups chicken stock

natural yoghurt, butter milk or sour cream, to serve
chopped fresh herbs, to serve
rye bread, to serve

Method:
Preheat oven 180C. Place the pumpkin and garlic on a well oiled tray and sprinkle with the brown sugar (to caramelise the pumpkin and just enhance the flavour more. Roast for 30 minutes or so until the pumpkin is cooked through

Whilst the pumpkin is roasting, add a little oil to a large pot and fry the vegetables until the onion is soft. Add the cumin. Add the chicken stock to the pot, bring to the boil and then reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes or so. Add the pumpkin to the pot, peel the garlic and then add to the pot. Remove the pot from the heat.

In batches puree the mixture until smooth. If you are making this in advance and have time to allow the mixture to cool before pureeing do, or if like me and the clock is fast approaching dinner time before pureeing, pour the mixture into a separate container and then after each batch pour the pureed soup back into the original pot over a low heat to warm it up.

Serve with sour cream or natural yoghurt or butter milk, fresh chives or parsley if you have them and some hearty rye bread to dip with.

Posted by HelenPalsson on 2006-07-03 12:51:28

Tagged: , 20060703 , soup , pumpkin , food

Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America (Interior)

Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America (Interior)

The 2013 James Beard Foundation Cookbook of the Year.

How to cook everything Latin American.

Gran Cocina Latina unifies the vast culinary landscape of the Latin world, from Mexico to Argentina and all the Spanish-speaking countries of the Caribbean. In one volume it gives home cooks, armchair travelers, and curious chefs the first comprehensive collection of recipes from this region. An inquisitive historian and a successful restaurateur, Maricel E. Presilla has spent more than thirty years visiting each country personally. She’s gathered more than 500 recipes for the full range of dishes, from the foundational adobos and sofritos to empanadas and tamales to ceviches and moles to sancocho and desserts such as flan and tres leches cake. Detailed equipment notes, drink and serving suggestions, and color photographs of finished dishes are also included. This is a one-of-a-kind cookbook to be savored and read as much for the writing and information as for its introduction to heretofore unrevealed recipes. MORE

BUY NOW:
Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Indiebound | Powell’s

Posted by WW Norton on 2012-09-25 16:55:39

Tagged: , recipes , cookbook , food , cuisine , latin america , maricel presilla

Beer-Brined Country Style Ribs

Beer-Brined Country Style Ribs

This is one of the best brine recipe I have ever tried. The meat was very tender and flavorful.

(adapted from Sunset magazine)

Beer-Brined Pork

3 cups (two 12-oz. bottles) flavorful beer such as amber ale
1/4 cup kosher salt
2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

In a 1 1/2- to 2-quart pan over medium heat, stir beer, salt, brown sugar, the peppercorns, mustard seeds, fennel seeds, and garlic until salt and sugar are dissolved. Let mixture cool completely. Place pork in a 2-gallon zip-lock plastic bag and add brine. Seal and chill 4 to 6 hours.

Posted by girlychimp on 2007-05-08 13:59:10

Tagged: , porb , grill , bbq , inner , cooking , home , recipe

Homemade Panettone IMG_2506

Homemade Panettone IMG_2506

In the early 20th century, two enterprising Milanese bakers began to produce panettone in large quantities in the rest of Italy. In 1919, Angelo Motta started producing his eponymous brand of cakes. It was also Motta who revolutionised the traditional panettone by giving it its tall domed shape by making the dough rise three times, or almost 20 hours, before cooking, giving it its now-familiar light texture. The recipe was adapted shortly after by another baker, Gioacchino Alemagna, around 1925, who also gave his name to a popular brand that still exists today. The stiff competition between the two that then ensued led to industrial production of the cake-like bread. Nestlé took over the brands together in the late 1990s, but Bauli, an Italian bakery company based in Verona, has acquired Motta and Alemagna from Nestlé.

As a result of the fierce competition, by the end of World War II, panettone was cheap enough for anyone and soon became the country’s leading Christmas sweet. Northern Italian immigrants to Argentina and Brazil also brought their love of panettone, and panettone is enjoyed for Christmas with hot cocoa or liquor during the holiday season, which became a mainstream tradition in those countries. In some places, it replaces the King cake.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panettone

Posted by Nicola since 1972 on 2014-12-22 19:05:29

Tagged: , NicolEttone , panettone

Cooking recipe from my kitchen

Cooking recipe from my kitchen

Taken by mithu1978 using Normal filter. Link – instagram.com/p/XiR0RRNar2/

Posted by Mithu78 on 2013-08-19 23:57:11

Tagged: , #foods , #hot , #foodgasm , #hungry , #eat , #foodpics , #foodpic , #eating , #delicious , #delish , #food , #tasty , #fresh , #breakfast , #lunch , #dinner , #sweet , #photooftheday , #instagood , #amazing , #yummy , #instafood , #yum , #foodporn , Wapping , flickriosapp:filter=NoFilter , uploaded:by=flickr_mobile be,sick,instalike,bad,sono,hkig,fiod,now,nerd,pictoftheday,loved,loveme,beef,healthy,country,iphoneonly,up,20likes,sunday,instaplace,versalove,summertime,night,grilled,tacobell,red,t,instagram

Myanmar Jan 2014 (66 of 715).jpg

Myanmar Jan 2014 (66 of 715).jpg

Lettuce, mint, broccoli and sauce at a stall selling food on the street in Myanmar (Burma)

Posted by PicciaNeri on 2014-02-19 16:00:45

Tagged: , Burma , Myanmar , Rangoon , South-east Asia , Yangon , adventure , buddhism , tourism , travel , Asia , Asian , Burmese , broccoli , cheap , chilli , condiment , cooking , cuisine , culture , developing country , dinner , dish , eatery , eating , food , food stall , food vendor , fresh , greens , handmade , herb , homemade , ingredients , lettuce , lunch , market , matural , meal , mint , peppers , poor , popular , recipe , restaurant , road , sauces , selection , sell , seller , sprouting , staple , street food , street life , third world , typical , urban , variety , vegetable , vegetarian

UBC Cinnamon Bun Recipe 1989

UBC Cinnamon Bun Recipe 1989

UBC Cinnamon buns: at last, the secret is out (From the Vancouver Sun)

Rolls:
3 cups (750ml) milk
6 tablespoons (90ml) margarine
6 tablespoons (90ml) sugar
1 tablespoon (15ml) salt
1 teaspoon (5ml) sugar
½ cup (125ml) warm water
2 envelopes active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2250ml) all-purpose flour, about

Filling:
¾ cup (175 ml) melted margarine, divided
1 ¼ cups (300mL) sugar
2 tablespoons (30ml) cinnamon

For rolls, scald milk. Stir in margarine, the six tablespoons sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm.
Dissolve the one teaspoon sugar in warm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes. Stir.
In large mixing bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast Add four to five cups of the flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Turn out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough). Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place until double in size, about one hour.

Punch dough down and turn out on lightly floured surface. Divide dough in half.
To fill, roll out each piece of dough into 9×18 inch rectangle. Brush each rectangle generously with melted margarine. Combine the 1 ¼ cups sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle an equal portion on each rectangle. Roll dough up like a jelly roll, starting from the long side. Cut into 2 inch slices. Place remaining melted margarine in bottom of 16 ½ x 11 ½ x 2 ½ inch. Arrange slices in pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in pan until doubled in size, about 45 to 60 minutes.

Bake at 350F for 35 to 45 minuets. Remove from oven and immediately invert onto severing tray. Makes 18 large cinnamon buns.

NOW FROM THE UBC ALUMNI SITE
www.alumni.ubc.ca/about/faq.php downloaded 2009-11-22

How do you make the UBC cinnamon buns?
UBC students have been hoovering up these sticky treats for more than 50 years. Introduced in 1954 by a Hungarian baker named Grace Hasz, the bake shop produces 100 dozen buns daily. In recent years, Food Services has produced a miniature version of the cinnamon bun, responding to our modern belief that rich, delicious foods are bad for us. The traditional recipe calls for margarine rather than butter. But why? Probably because the original recipe was concocted post WWII when butter was hard to come by.

Dough
3 cups (750 mL) 2% milk
6 tablespoons (90 mL) butter
6 tablespoons (90 mL) granulated sugar
1 tablespoon (15 mL) salt
1 teaspoon (5 mL) sugar
1/2 cup (125 mL) warm water
2 (8 g) packages active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2.25 L) all-purpose flour, about

Filling
11/4 cups (300 mL) sugar
2 tablespoons (30 mL) ground cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) melted butter, divided

Dough: Scald milk. Stir in butter, 6 tablespoons (90 mL) sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Dissolve the 1 teaspoon (5 mL) sugar in lukewarm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes; stir. In large bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast. Add 4 to 5 cups (1 to 1.25 L) flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon, gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Turn dough out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough.) Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place for 1 hour or until double in size.

Meanwhile prepare filling: In small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon; set aside.

Punch down dough and turn out on to lightly floured surface. Divide dough in half. Roll out each piece of dough into 18×9-inch (46×23 cm) rectangle. Brush each rectangle generously with melted butter. Place remaining melted butter in bottom of 161/2 x111/2 x21/2-inch (42x29x6 cm) pan. Sprinkle an equal portion of sugar-cinnamon mixture evenly over each rectangle. Roll each dough rectangle up tightly like a jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. With sharp knife, cut into 2-inch (5 cm) slices. Arrange slices, cut-side down, in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm place for 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size.

Bake at 350 F (180 C) for 35 to 45 minutes or until baked. Remove from oven and immediately invert on to serving tray.

Makes 18 large cinnamon buns.

Approximate nutritional analysis for each serving: 433 cal, 9 g pro, 14 g fat, 69 g carb.

The info below is from …. www.100.ubc.ca/celebratingpeople/staff/cunningham.html

When I originally asked who was the master of the famous UBC cinnamon bun, both Andrew Parr,
head of UBC Food Services, and Executive Chef Piyush Sahay said without hesitation, "Peter Cunningham."
Peter has worked at Totem Park Dining Hall since 1974. For 20 years he’s worked the midnight shift as the pastry chef. It made me wonder how many cinnamon buns one person could bake over that time period. I don’t need to wonder anymore because as soon as I arrived Peter said that he and Piyush had calculated that he had baked over seven million buns. That’s impressive. So I asked him the greatest number of buns he’s baked in a single night. 150 dozen which my calculator tells me is 1,800 buns. I have finally met the person who can open the vault on making great cinnamon buns.

I had originally intended to capture my interview with Peter on video. But my digital ineptitude, combined with Peter’s put an end to that idea. In truth I wish I had, because words don’t adequately capture his animation when he described how the dough is just right,when the texture isn’t too firm or too soft, how you have to add a little of this and a little of that so that it’s just so, that only experience can tell you when it’s perfect and how hard it is to remove all the dough that ends up all over you after a night of heavy baking.

I asked him if anyone could make a great bun. "Anyone can make a bun," he said, "but it takes experience to make a great bun." Both Peter and Piyush agreed that the seasoned cinnamon bun connoisseur knows when there is the slightest change in the recipe or technique, and they definitely hear about it.

When I asked Peter what had changed over the years, he said volume. Health concerns have decreased demand and also prompted the removal of trans fats from the recipe. Other than that, the recipe is exactly the same as the one created by Grace Hasz in 1954.

A beautiful sleek oven with cinnamon twists baking inside is the new energy efficient computerized combi-oven that recently replaced the six-rack rotary oven that "took up the space of a small room," Piyush said.

The only other concession to time is that the mini cinnamon buns are affectionately referred to as ”nanos.” Although not available daily, they can be ordered through Catering, Central Kitchen or the retail outlets.

Now that’s a beautiful marriage between tradition and modernity.

cakeonthebrain.blogspot.com/2008/04/cinnamon-bun-styles-t…

I have a 15 year old Black and Decker bread machine stashed away in my cupboard.

You didn’t know Black and Decker made bread machines, didja? (no, I didn’t buy it at Home Depot!) I have gotten some good use out of my machine and it’s still chugging along no problems…knock-on-wood! Though it’s an ugly beast it does the job. It doesn’t have a little glass window so you can watch the bread mix, rise and bake. I just lift the lid and take a peek. What I discovered is that it’s perfect for making really wet and sticky doughs. I just use the "dough" setting and when it’s ready I do the rest by hand. I’ve made foccaccia, brioche and of course cinnamon buns with this great dough setting.

I was flipping through my collection of cinnamon bun recipes and I came across a couple of favourites…

In Vancouver, we have an institution that makes the best Cinnamon Buns ever. They’re unique and you have to be a starving university student to understand the cult-like following that these buns have. In fact, you have to be on campus to purchase these buns. The University of British Columbia has the best caramelized cinnamon buns out there. There’s no stupid raisins sticking out of the dough. There’s no nuts and there’s no cream cheese frosting. The texture is lighter and they’re not as rich as the ones you buy at the mall. But these suckers are HUGE. Each bun is about 3 inches tall and the size of a side plate. The centres are of course the best with all their sticky gooeyness.

When I was attending UBC, I’d buy one and it would sustain me the whole day. Not a very balanced diet, but this wasn’t what I did every day. I acquired the UBC Cinnamon Bun recipe from the local newspaper, The Vancouver Sun, and made them many times. The last time I made it, as I was pulling the roasting pan out of the oven, (yes, they’re so huge you need a roasting pan for them) the pan touched my inner forearm and I had the nastiest burn ever. I haven’t really made them since.

However, if you’re a daredevil and think you could eat the whole batch, I’ll include the recipe for UBC Cinnamon buns in this post. It’s a traditional recipe, made by hand, and yields enough buns to feed a small country or your kids’ soccer team. Just scroll to the bottom.

The next best thing to UBC Cinnamon buns are those that you get slathered with cream cheese frosting. There are different chains producing them in the food courts in malls and some bakeries and coffee shops carry them too.

I have a quick and easy Bread Machine Cream Cheese Frosting slathered Sin-Amen (hey, I coined an oxymoron!) Bun recipe.

The dough is all mixed in your Bread Machine according to manufacturer’s instructions…on just the dough cycle. You take out the dough, roll it out and fill it and then roll it up like a jellyroll. You don’t even have to wait for a second rise. You just pop it in the hot oven and by the time you finish creaming together the frosting, the buns are ready!

So you can choose your cinnamon bun style today: traditional (i.e. time-consuming), light and caramelized or quick (i.e. bread machine), dense, gooey, creamy and rich

SIN-AMEN ROLLS WITH CREAM CHEESE FROSTING
(BREAD MACHINE METHOD)

DOUGH:
1 T (1 pkg) dry yeast
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 t salt
4 cups all purpose flour
1 cup milk
2 large eggs
1/3 cup unsalted butter, cut up into 1 cm cubes

FILLING:
1 cup packed golden sugar
2 1/2 T cinnamon
1/3 cup unsalted butter, melted
ICING:
8 T unsalted butter, softened
1/2 cups powdered sugar
1/4 cup cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 t vanilla
1/8 t salt

PREHEAT the oven to 400 degreesF

DOUGH: following the manufacturer’s instructions, dump all the dough ingredients into the bread machine in the correct order. Press the dough setting.

While the dough is being processed in the machine, prepare the Filling and the Icing.

FILLING: mix the golden brown sugar and cinnamon well.

When the dough cycle is complete, roll out the dough to approximately 21 inches by 16 inches. [cakebrain’s secret tip: I do all of my rolling on a plastic wrap-lined counter. I sandwich the dough between two layers of plastic wrap and roll with a rolling pin until I get my desired measurements. Yes, it’s unorthodox, but I don’t make a mess, it isn’t sticky, I don’t use additional flour and it’s a breeze to clean up! Scoff if you must, you professional pastry chefs, but I’m not wasting time cleaning up afterwards!]

Using a pastry brush, brush the melted butter evenly on the rolled out dough. [don’t forget to peel off the top layer of plastic wrap before you do this!]

Sprinkle the sugar & cinnamon mixture evenly over the dough.

Roll it up jelly-roll style, starting at the long edge. [cakebrain tip#2: If you were following my tip about the plastic wrap, you’d be doing this step easily. Just pick up one long edge of the plastic wrap underneath, and use it to lift the dough and roll it. I also gently press on the roll to make sure it’s not too loose. When you get to the end, just use the plastic wrap to help you move the roll around. You don’t have to actually touch the dough…it’s super sticky. Of course, when you’re all done, discard the plastic wrap.]

Using a serrated bread knife, and a sawing action, cut the dough equally in half. Then cut each half equally in half again. You should have 4 equally long pieces. Cut each of these into 3 equal lengths. You will have a total of 12 cinnamon buns.

Place the buns cut side down an equal distance apart in a buttered baking pan

Bake for 12-15 minutes or until light golden brown.

FROSTING: cream the softened butter and cream cheese until smooth. Mix in confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and salt until well combined. Frost the cinnamon buns with the frosting after they’ve cooled. [I usually frost half of the buns because some people don’t like frosting or like to control how much they have. I just keep the rest of the frosting in a bowl for them to serve themselves]

these freeze well!

*************

Now, what some of you UBC alumni may have been looking for high and low. These are the legendary, gargantuan

UBC CINNAMON BUNS

(as published in the Vancouver Sun)

DOUGH
3 cups (750mL) milk (2%M.F.)
6 T (90 mL) butter
6 T (90 mL) granulated sugar
1 T (15 mL) salt
1 t (5 mL) granulated sugar
1/2 cup (125 mL) lukewarm water
2 (8 g) packages traditional active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2.25 L) all-purpose flour, about
FILLING
1 1/4 cups (300 mL) granulated sugar
2 T (30 mL) ground cinnamon
3/4 cup (175mL) melted butter, divided

For the dough: scald milk. Stir in butter, 6 T sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm
Dissolve the 1 t sugar in lukewarm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes; stir
In large bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast. Add 4 to 5 cups flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon, gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.
Turn dough out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough). Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place for 1 hour or until double in size.
Meanwhile, prepare filling: In small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon; set aside
Punch down dough and turn out on to lightly floured surface. Divide the dough in half
Roll out each piece of dough into 18 x 9 inch (46x23cm) rectangle Brush each rectangle generously with melted butter. Place remaining melted butter in bottom of a large 16.5×11.5×2.5inch roasting pan (42x29x6cm)
Sprinkle an equal portion of sugar-cinnamon mixture evenly over each rectangle. Roll each dough rectangle up tightly like a jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. With sharp knife, cut into 2inch (5cm) slices. Arrange slices, cut-side down, in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm place for 45 to 60 minutes or until double in size.
Bake at 350degreesF (180C) for 35-45 minutes or until baked
Remove from oven and immediately invert on to serving tray.
Makes 18 large cinnamon buns
approx. nutritional analysis for each serving: 433 cal, 9 g pro, 14 g fat, 69 g carb

Posted by Gord McKenna on 2009-11-15 04:47:19

Tagged: , gordmckenna , UBC , cinnamon , buns , sticky , University , British , Columbia , Canada , recipe , bakery , newspaper , baking , oven , bun , cafeteria , sub , food , services , tuck , shop , alberta , college , school , cooking , flour , roll , Hungarian , baker , Grace Hasz , UBC Food Services , stickybun , butter , margarine , Vancouver Sun , University of British Columbia

DIY Bread

DIY Bread

This little loaf is the most successful of my bread-making attempts so far. Not that the others haven’t been tasty as well, but I like the crackling crust very much, and that has been a bit tricky to achieve.

Recipe (approx.)

~5 cups of flour
~1 cup of oatmeal
3 cups of warm water
2 teaspoons of salt
1 tablespoon of sugar
sufficient amount of yeast (I used one packet of dry yeast, but packet sizes vary by country)
trace amounts of misc. spices (e.g. black onion seeds)

Let rise covered for about 1½ hours or so, take out approx. one third or fourth and shape into a loaf (wet hands + flour to keep it from sticking), turn the oven on to 230°C and let the loaf (and remaining dough) rise while it heats up. Just before putting the loaf into the oven, slash the top with a knife in a couple of places. Put a shallow pan filled with hot water into the hot oven along with the loaf. Bake for about 15-20 minutes (i.e. until brown throughout and only just starting to burn at the top), let cool completely before cutting. Refrigerate the rest of the dough and bake remaining loaves in a similar fashion on following days, but let each cool loaf rise for about half an hour.

(Cups used in the measure because I used a US cup measure instead of the more Finnish decilitres. In any case the amounts are not exact.)

Posted by Arkku on 2009-11-18 15:07:27

Tagged: , bread , baked , food , cooking , object , indoor , recipe