Category Archives: Organic cooking

Arboretum

Arboretum

This is my first MOC.

After a long dark age, it recently became obvious to me, while playing with my three years old daughter, that LEGO was a fabulous source of inspiration and creation.
The discovery of the AFOL community and a few recent amazing TLG sets made me realize how far LEGO had gone since my childhood (we’re talking CS and CC era here).
This immediately made me feel the urge to try building stuff on my own.
A natural inclination towards architecture and organic structures made me want to try building a castle first. Welcome to Arboretum!

—–

Arboretum is an outpost castle situated in a damp tropical region, not too far away from the sea coast (somewhere between the Black Marsh, Stranglethorn Vale, and Belfalas ;-), lying deep within a wet forest where walls have ears and mushrooms have eyes.
Its inhabitants are made of a wide bunch of characters and species, which seem to cohabit in a peaceful atmosphere, as well as a few unwanted guests.
Human guards keep watch of the main entrance on the catwalk (they mostly want to know when they’ll get to eat the turkey), while an unidentified bearded man in black seems to be the only one to know what the heck he’s doing here.
Wood elves keep watch of the weapons and treasure stashes, scrutinizing the horizon with their keen eyes while dreaming about the stars.
Hidden in the shadow of the Great Tree in the Arboretum room, William the Alchemist, lost in his thoughts, is imagining his next recipe while keeping an eye on the skull of his predecessor, freezed in resin.
On the terrace of the arboretum, a Kaï Man and an Orc share a game of apples, while a Dwarf is about to stove an argonian thief in front of the main entrance door.

The courtyard is equipped with a small weapons keep, food and drink for a small feast, as well as a tiny library for 101 situations – how to cook a roast on a rainy night, how to stop bleeding when the enemy just cut one of your limbs, and other useful fun facts.
The chapel is where the phials are kept and alchemical experiments made in the shade of the central oculus.
The conference hall on the second floor of the back tower has a hearth (lit by leds). It’s the room where the most precious – material and intellectual – treasures are kept in deep shadow.
The arboretum itself is kept on the third floor of the back tower. Its Great Tree is all at once the source and fruit of the castle’s inhabitant’s high level of alchemical knowledge and power. The alchemically enhanced tree growing in the room is powerful enough to have broken through the roof and part of the walls of the room now lying in ruins.

—–

The original sparkle for this MOC was Sebaastian Art’s (www.flickr.com/photos/30639040@N02/) great castle tutorial in The LEGO Ideas Book (as is pretty obvious if you compare the front faceted low wall of Arboretum to the suggested model in the book ;-). Trying out some of his very elegant wall techniques led me to try and build a whole new thing; a vertical setup was chosen to save physical space, and because I love towers 🙂

I wanted to try out a few "advanced" techniques (advanced to me, anyway), and online documentation was amazing for this matter. I also wished to use a few "special" pieces out of context (the SW cockpit, the big trans-clear motorcycle rim, the planet hemisphere), which led to some tricky technical problems to solve. Yummy!

Arboretum stands on a 32×32 baseplate. It’s a modular building, which makes it easy to move around : the second floor of the front tower, the second and third floors as well as the roof of the back tower can be lifted up to have access to the room interiors, which have furniture and specific decoration elements.

I spent about a week (four or five nights, to be more realistic) building the castle. It took me much longer than that to set up my own photo "studio" and begin to understand the use of a camera and lighting setup…
Lack of elements and experience led me to some choices I would probably solve differently three months later. It certainly doesn’t pretend to respect any kind of castle building or historical orthodoxy.
But hey, I had great fun building it.

Hope you enjoy Arboretum!

Posted by Labsynth Saltcrown on 2014-06-30 14:26:20

Tagged: , LEGO , MOC , AFOL , Castle , Fantasy , Outpost , Vegetal , Labsynth

Green Tea Ice-Cream + Recipe

Green Tea Ice-Cream + Recipe

Sorry for my distinct lack of uploads, i have been very busy on the food front, and this has taken up all my time.

I first tried Green Tea Ice-cream when I visited my father in Brisbane, Australia, he had taken me to his favorite Sushi Bar, called Sushi Train and he recommended that I try it, I have been searching for a recipe that came close to the amazing taste of the Sushi Train version. After a bit of trial and error, and research, this is what I have come up with:
Ingredients
100ml Double cream
500ml Full fat milk. (UHT works great)
3 Medium egg yolks
110g Castor sugar
8-10g Organic green tea powder (Matcha) (I find eBay a great place to buy this)
Spring of fresh mint to serve. (optional)

1. Pour the cream and the milk into a saucepan and place over a medium heat, whilst stirring, slowly bring just to the boil, then quickly remove from the heat.
2. In a large bowl cream together the egg yolks, sugar and green tea until it has thicken, then slowly add this mixture into the hot cream/milk mixture.
3. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan over a lowish heat and cook for around 12 minutes, continually stirring with a wooden spoon, until the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon. Do not over cook this mixture as it with curdle and ruin.
4. Sieve the mixture into a clean bowl and allow to cool completely.
5. Place into an ice-cream machine until frozen.
Alternatively if you do not have a machine, place into a freezable container and freeze for two hours then blitz it in a food processor and repeat this process 3-4 times.
6. Remove from freezer/machine, place in a food processor and blitz until smooth and refreeze until needed. This process really smooths the ice-cream and gets rid of any ice crystals that may of appeared.

Many more recipes can be found on my food blog. lyonsmade.blogspot.com/ please take a look.

Posted by Mr Craig Lyons. on 2011-05-10 14:37:11

Tagged: , green tea , ice-cream , ice , cream , food , dessert , green , spoon , plate , recipe , mint , yummy , ourdailychallenge , foreign

rhubarb pie

rhubarb pie

recept is here zoryanchik.com/recipe/tvorozhnyj-pirog-s-revenem/

Posted by Zoryanchik on 2015-05-04 20:25:12

Tagged: , apple , bake , breakfast , cake , close , closeup , color , cooking , crust , delicious , dessert , diet , dinner , drink , eating , elegant , food , fresh , fruit , gourmet , green , healthy , homemade , image , nobody , nutrition , organic , party , pastry , pie , plate , portion , raw , red , rhubarb , ripe , round , single , snack , sour , strawberry , sugar , sweet , tart , taste , tasty , treat , vegetable , wheat , white

Fresh | Nopales

Fresh | Nopales

Not sure what these are…does anyone know what they are and how they are used? I know they are eaten, but are they eaten raw, cooked, used in specific recipes, etc?

Please share if you know!

Posted by D.James | Darren J. Ryan on 2005-08-27 03:28:13

Tagged: , farmer’s , market , georgia , state , fresh , fruit , vegetables , organic , natural , farmer’s market , colors , colorful , cactaceae , opuntia , djames , stock , photo , darren ryan , darren , ryan , d , james , photography , photographer , wii , technorati , blog , j , copyright , all rights reserved , atlanta , usa , architecture , architectural , urban , www.darrenjryan.com , www.studiobydjames.com , darren j. ryan , www.darrenryanphotography.com

latte

latte

A cafe that supports local produce and serves only organic rainforest alliance coffee.
Read more here – jeroxie.com/addiction/ici-cafe/

Posted by jeroxie on 2009-12-11 22:38:03

Tagged: , cooking with a microwave using fresh ingredients , pork and miso soup noodle , microwave recipe , microwave vegetables , cooking soup in microwave , microwave food , microwave dinner , food , breakfast

Arboretum

Arboretum

This is my first MOC.

After a long dark age, it recently became obvious to me, while playing with my three years old daughter, that LEGO was a fabulous source of inspiration and creation.
The discovery of the AFOL community and a few recent amazing TLG sets made me realize how far LEGO had gone since my childhood (we’re talking CS and CC era here).
This immediately made me feel the urge to try building stuff on my own.
A natural inclination towards architecture and organic structures made me want to try building a castle first. Welcome to Arboretum!

—–

Arboretum is an outpost castle situated in a damp tropical region, not too far away from the sea coast (somewhere between the Black Marsh, Stranglethorn Vale, and Belfalas ;-), lying deep within a wet forest where walls have ears and mushrooms have eyes.
Its inhabitants are made of a wide bunch of characters and species, which seem to cohabit in a peaceful atmosphere, as well as a few unwanted guests.
Human guards keep watch of the main entrance on the catwalk (they mostly want to know when they’ll get to eat the turkey), while an unidentified bearded man in black seems to be the only one to know what the heck he’s doing here.
Wood elves keep watch of the weapons and treasure stashes, scrutinizing the horizon with their keen eyes while dreaming about the stars.
Hidden in the shadow of the Great Tree in the Arboretum room, William the Alchemist, lost in his thoughts, is imagining his next recipe while keeping an eye on the skull of his predecessor, freezed in resin.
On the terrace of the arboretum, a Kaï Man and an Orc share a game of apples, while a Dwarf is about to stove an argonian thief in front of the main entrance door.

The courtyard is equipped with a small weapons keep, food and drink for a small feast, as well as a tiny library for 101 situations – how to cook a roast on a rainy night, how to stop bleeding when the enemy just cut one of your limbs, and other useful fun facts.
The chapel is where the phials are kept and alchemical experiments made in the shade of the central oculus.
The conference hall on the second floor of the back tower has a hearth (lit by leds). It’s the room where the most precious – material and intellectual – treasures are kept in deep shadow.
The arboretum itself is kept on the third floor of the back tower. Its Great Tree is all at once the source and fruit of the castle’s inhabitant’s high level of alchemical knowledge and power. The alchemically enhanced tree growing in the room is powerful enough to have broken through the roof and part of the walls of the room now lying in ruins.

—–

The original sparkle for this MOC was Sebaastian Art’s (www.flickr.com/photos/30639040@N02/) great castle tutorial in The LEGO Ideas Book (as is pretty obvious if you compare the front faceted low wall of Arboretum to the suggested model in the book ;-). Trying out some of his very elegant wall techniques led me to try and build a whole new thing; a vertical setup was chosen to save physical space, and because I love towers 🙂

I wanted to try out a few "advanced" techniques (advanced to me, anyway), and online documentation was amazing for this matter. I also wished to use a few "special" pieces out of context (the SW cockpit, the big trans-clear motorcycle rim, the planet hemisphere), which led to some tricky technical problems to solve. Yummy!

Arboretum stands on a 32×32 baseplate. It’s a modular building, which makes it easy to move around : the second floor of the front tower, the second and third floors as well as the roof of the back tower can be lifted up to have access to the room interiors, which have furniture and specific decoration elements.

I spent about a week (four or five nights, to be more realistic) building the castle. It took me much longer than that to set up my own photo "studio" and begin to understand the use of a camera and lighting setup…
Lack of elements and experience led me to some choices I would probably solve differently three months later. It certainly doesn’t pretend to respect any kind of castle building or historical orthodoxy.
But hey, I had great fun building it.

Hope you enjoy Arboretum!

Posted by Labsynth Saltcrown on 2014-06-30 14:26:17

Tagged: , LEGO , MOC , AFOL , Castle , Fantasy , Outpost , Vegetal , Labsynth

Braised Chicken with Fennel and White Beans Recipe (Gluten Free)

Braised Chicken with Fennel and White Beans Recipe (Gluten Free)

INGREDIENTS:

3 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
1 cut-up whole chicken (2 1/2 to 3 lb), skin removed
1/4 teaspoon coarse (kosher or sea) salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 small onion, cut into thin wedges
2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 fennel bulb, quartered, cored, thinly sliced
1 medium yellow bell pepper, cut into bite-size strips
1 can (28 oz) Muir Glen® organic whole peeled tomatoes, undrained
1/2 cup dry white wine or Progresso® chicken broth (from 32-oz carton)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 can (15 or 19 oz) Progresso® cannellini beans, drained, rinsed
Chopped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley, if desired

DIRECTIONS:

1. In deep 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Add chicken pieces to skillet; cook 5 to 6 minutes, turning occasionally, until chicken is light golden brown. Remove chicken from skillet.

2. Add onion, garlic, fennel and bell pepper to skillet. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, stirring constantly, until vegetables are crisp-tender. Add chicken, tomatoes, wine and rosemary; break up tomatoes. Heat to boiling. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 20 to 25 minutes, turning chicken once, until chicken is tender.

3. Stir in beans. Cook uncovered about 5 minutes longer or until sauce is slightly thickened and juice of chicken is clear when thickest piece is cut to bone (170°F for breasts; 180°F for thighs and drumsticks). Serve in shallow bowls; sprinkle with parsley.

Posted by Betty Crocker Recipes on 2011-01-22 22:44:16

Tagged: , General Mills , Betty Crocker , recipe , Braised Chicken with Fennel and White Beans Recipe , Gluten Free , GF , chicken , fennel , white beans , Muir Glen , organic , Progresso , garlic , cannellini beans , parsley , skillet , bell pepper , braised chicken , chicken broth , white wine , rosemary

pannecotta

pannecotta

Panna Cotta with Ripe Mango
From Simple Seduction in Three Courses, February 2001
splendidtable.publicradio.org/recipes/special_seduction_p…

Serves 4

Wine Suggestion: a rich, sweet red Recioto della Valpolicella Classico La Roggia by Fratelli Speri.

This is one of the most sensual desserts I know. It’s a cross between soft ice cream and rich custard. Serve it with dicings of ripe mango.

Cook to Cook: Use organic cream if possible and be sure the sour cream contains only cream and culture, no other additives (Daisy is one brand to look for). This recipe unmolds with a soft, creamy finish. For a firmer panna cotta, increase the gelatin to 1 teaspoon.

* 3/4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
* 1 tablespoons cold water
* 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
* 1/4 cup sugar, or more to taste
* dash of salt
* 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
* 1/2 cup sour cream

1. Sprinkle the gelatin over the cold water. Let stand for 5 minutes. In a 2-quart saucepan, warm the cream with the sugar, salt, and vanilla over medium-high heat. Do not let it boil. Stir in the gelatin until thoroughly dissolved. Take the cream off the heat and cool about 5 minutes.

2. Put the sour cream in a medium bowl. Gently whisk in the warm cream a little at a time until smooth. Taste for sweetness. It may need another teaspoon of sugar. Rinse 4 2/3-cup ramekins, custard cups, or coffee cups with cold water. Fill each one three-quarters full with the cream. Chill 4 to 24 hours.

3. To serve, either unmold by packing the molds in hot towels and then turning each out onto a dessert plate, or serve in their containers. Serve with diced ripe mango.

Posted by kitkabbit on 2009-05-22 06:07:55

Tagged: , cooking , 2009 , pannecotta , strawberry , dessert

Mixed Berry Earl Grey Cake

Mixed Berry Earl Grey Cake

TasteTea Earl Grey Mixed Berries Cake
An entry for IMBB #17 by Renée

Adapted from the Peach Blueberry Cake in the August 2005 issue of Gourmet

Finally persuaded into participating in an online food blog event, I chose to meld a tasty (pun intended) looking cake on this month’s issue of Gourmet with an item I own way too many blends of. I felt this experiment fitting as I had some strawberries, blueberries and black raspberries from the local Farmer’s Market that I had to use up while fresh. So I also decided to forgo the peaches, or even apricots, and fill the cake with the berries instead. Apparently the “moderate temperature” used to bake this cake helps keep the ripe fruit from bursting and releasing its juices, and as I was planning to have a cake filled with only berries, I took this word of advice to heart and didn’t question the long baking time. What intrigued me most was that Gourmet noted that the pastry is moist and crumby, similar to both a biscuit and a cake. This I had to try! In keeping with the theme of IMBB#17, I chose to use the fantastic taste of Earl Grey tea (in this case Monk’s Blend Earl Grey), as I really enjoy its aroma in Earl Grey Shortbread Sandwich cookies that I make from time to time (which I love to fill with Brandied Apricot Preserves).

The pastry portion of the cake along tea choice was the highlight of the dessert, as the scent emanating from the cake was still apparent the next day, when relatively few slices remained. Surprisingly, the cake “crust” remained loosely short and dry despite moist the fruit filling. In addition, I have no idea how Gourmet was able to fit the pastry crust lining a whole 9-inch springform pan; I needed to use my 7-inch pan to have the crust reach the top of the pan’s lip. In retrospect, I should have pressed the pastry crust into a 9-inch springform pan and had the edges only go halfway up the pan to make the cake more of a flat fruit tart like presentation.

Clement also knows I’m not one for super sweet, goopy or greasy foods (he holds the butter and fat crown), * so I reduced the amounts used in my version of this cake. As I like the way whole strawberries look when you slice into them in classic Herme creations, I decided to keep my strawberries whole, and set them up as a foundation layer in the cake, where the smaller blueberries and raspberries would cook and cascade down their glorious sides. However, when the cake was cut, everything pretty much cooked into each other as a big purple crater ridden molten mess. To salvage the look of my cake, I scattered some toasted sliced almonds on top of the berry mound, and finished things off with a dusting of icing sugar (a “Renee Signature” if all else fails!), and voila, my own summery TasteTea masterpiece!

Serves 6-8 people

For the cake/pastry:
1 ½ C all-purpose flour (I used organic)
1/3 C sugar
2 tablespoon Earl Grey tea leaves, finely ground and sifted
1 teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
½ C cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes
2 large egg whites (or 1 large egg)
1 teaspoon vanilla

For the filling:
1/3 C sugar
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon quick-cooking tapioca
1 C blueberries
1 1/3 C strawberries, stems removed
½ C raspberries (I used black raspberries)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon grated lemon zest, optional

Topping:
¼ C sliced almonds, lightly toasted
icing sugar for dusting
Berries/mint sprig for decoration

Freshly whipped cream, optional

Pastry Instructions:
1) In a food processor (or in a big bowl, as in my case) sift together flour, sugar, tea powder, baking powder, and salt.
2) Add butter and pulse (or cut with a pastry blender) until mixture resembles course meal and contains some pea-sized butter lumps.
3) Add eggs and vanilla and pulse/mix until dough until it starts to clump together and form a ball.
4) Press the dough onto the bottom and up the entire side of the springform pan in an even ¼-inch thick layer.
5) Chill the pastry in the pan until it is firm, at least 10 minutes to overnight.

Filling Instructions:
6) Place the oven rack in the middle position and preheat oven to 375°F.
7) Gind together 2 tablespoons of sugar with the flour and tapioca until powdery, then transfer mixture to a large bowl. Add the remaining sugar, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, lemon juice and rind; toss to coat well.
8) Pick out the strawberries and stand them, top side (where the stew was removed) down on to the base of the pastry, covering entire base of pastry. Spoon remaining berries and filling over the strawberry base.
9) Loosely cover the cake with a sheet of foil and bake, until filling is bubbling in the center and the crust is golden, about 1 ¾ hours.
10) Transfer the cake, still in the pan, to a cooling rack and allow cake to cool uncovered for 20 minutes.
11) Toast almonds in an oven until slightly golden. Allow to cool. Then toss with some icing sugar; set aside.
12) Run a knife between the pan and the pastry and carefully remove the sides of the pan.
13) Allow cake to cool to room temperature, sprinkle on the toasted almond and icing sugar mixture, then dust cake top generously with icing sugar. Top with a few fresh berries or mint sprig. Cut cake into thick wedges with a sharp knife before serving. And serve with whipped cream.

* Let me quote verbatim a conversation we had recently in defence of my statement.
Clement says: basically I think everything should melt in your mouth.
Renka says: like fat FAT FAT FAT
Clement says: hahaha. if that’s what melt in your mouth means to you. then I guess so.

Posted by Renée S. Suen on 2006-01-28 06:35:08

Tagged: , dessert , Cake , From Renée’s Kitchen , baked goods , Explore , interesting , interestingness , recipe , recipes